Coastal region of South Carolina unveils brand-new innovation action plan

Coastal region of South Carolina unveils new technology action plan

The technology action plan is geared toward those households with no or limited access to high-speed internet.

Corinne Lestch

December 18, 2017

Bio

Corinne LestchEducation staff reporter – EdScoop, FedScoop and StateScoop

Corinne Lestch is a staff reporter covering education for EdScoop and its affiliate public sector technology news websites, FedScoop and StateScoop…

FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn with Jim Stritzinger, Director of Connect South Carolina, a local subsidiary of Connected Nation, on Nov. 27.

The South Carolina Lowcountry may be a stunning tourist attraction, with its natural beauty and historic cities, but one thing is not up to speed with the rest of the area: broadband.

That’s why a new Technology Action Plan, unveiled recently by the Lowcountry Promise Zone Broadband Team, has become a top priority for the six-county region. Currently, 28,474 households in the region do not have a fixed broadband connection, and 63 percent of households with internet access are dissatisfied with their current service, according to statistics cited by officials.

Upcoming projects in the South Carolina zone include establishing “homework hotspots,” expanding regional telehealth initiatives and promoting low-cost broadband programs. The Lowcountry Promise Zone is one of several around the U.S. where the federal government works with local leaders to improve quality of life. The Broadband Team included representatives from school districts, arts and cultural groups, higher ed institutions and government agencies.

The homework hotspots would be accessible outside of regular school hours and exist in community gathering places. The plan encourages schools to coordinate with companies that work within the region, including AT&T, CenturyLink and Comcast, to offer low-cost monthly internet subscription packages, as well as leverage federal programs like Lifeline.

“Schools should coordinate with these companies to provide information to K-12 families to encourage the use of these programs, as well as the federal Lifeline program aimed at reducing the cost of broadband service for low-income households,” according to the Technology Action Plan.

The matter is so urgent that Federal Communications Commissioner Mignon Clyburn attended last month’s launch of the plan in Barnwell, South Carolina. Clyburn has several ties to the state, including graduating from the University of South Carolina and serving for 11 years as a member of the sixth district on the Public Service
Commission (PSC) of South Carolina. Clyburn also has been one of the most outspoken critics of the FCC’s recent
decision to repeal net neutrality rules, which required broadband providers to treat websites equally and not charge for higher-quality content.

At the event in South Carolina, she highlighted some of the grimmer statistics around poverty and unemployment.

“With an estimated poverty rate of about 28 percent, and an unemployment rate of just under 15 percent, there is no question that the Lowcountry Promise Zone deserves sustained, visionary and focused leadership,” Clyburn said.

The Broadband Team “spent months completing a comprehensive community assessment to identify ways to improve access to broadband and other technologies,” said Jim Stritzinger, director of Connect South Carolina, a local subsidiary of Connected Nation, an organization that works to upgrade technology in rural areas.

“The Technology Action Plan we developed from that work is a blueprint for how to improve the quality of life for all and how to restart the economic engine of the Promise Zone,” he said.

The plan emphasizes improving connectivity for several demographic groups, including households making less than $50,000 annually, adults without a college degree, the unemployed, households without school-age children and households with active or retired military personnel. Proponents of the plan say those kinds of households can see dramatic benefits from having high-speed internet access for the first time.

“We see this across the country — people being left out of opportunities to improve their lives whether through education, jobs or access to healthcare,” said Tom Ferree, chairman and CEO of Connected Nation. “These are families living in poverty, our nation’s veterans and our grandmothers and grandfathers, among others, who are being left out of opportunities the rest of us enjoy.”

Clyburn added urgently that broadband “is no longer a luxury; it is essential to our daily lives.”

“Broadband is the gateway through which many Lowcountry residents and businesses obtain critical information, find jobs, stay connected with teachers and healthcare providers, and keep up-to-date with family and friends,” she said. “But, as I have often said, and your report affirms, deployment is only part of the equation. We must put a spotlight on affordability, because it is those in the lowest income brackets that are the least likely to adopt broadband and it is those least able to afford broadband who stand to benefit the most.”

Stay alert to all the latest education IT news.

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http://edscoop.com/coastal-region-of-south-carolina-unveils-new-technology-action-plan

Shop here, not there: Science says reducing economic inequality could be that simple.

Imagine heading out to run errands at all your usual places, and your phone’s “equity app” has a better idea.

Siri might say, “Buy your groceries at one of these other stores, just as close as your regular store.” Or “There are three coffee shops within 2 miles. You haven’t tried this one before.”

We already get shopping suggestions when we bring up Google Maps, especially when our smartphones are transmitting our GPS coordinates. A similar type of computation is happening behind the scenes at Facebook and Twitter, whose targeted ads can sometimes be scarily on point.

But what if, instead of just boosting sales, those suggestions coming from your phone were designed to address social problems like inequality?

A group of researchers in France and Spain may have solved one preliminary puzzle toward getting us to that point.

In the paper, “Crowdsourcing the Robin Hood Effect in Cities,” published in June 2017 in the journal Applied Network Science, the researchers describe a computer algorithm they created that attempts to “rewire” the complex network of commercial transactions and shopping trips people take part in every day. The goal is to redirect more money to poorer neighborhoods so that the wealth differences between rich and poor parts of a city are evened out.

The study used data from 150,000 people and 95,000 businesses in Barcelona and Madrid, and on the surface the pattern of transactions and the money spent revealed that some neighborhoods were up to five times wealthier than others.

But researchers were shocked to find that if as few as 5% of commercial transactions were changed — so that capital flowed from richer to poorer neighborhoods — income inequality in those cities was drastically reduced, up to 80%.

“We were not expecting that,” said one of the study’s authors, Maxime Lenormand of the National Research Institute of Science and Technology for Environment and Agriculture in Montpelier, France. “Actually, I checked the algorithm because I was not sure in the beginning that everything was OK in the code.”

Lenormand conducted the study of the Robin Hood Effect with Thomas Louail of the Paris-based National Center for Scientific Research’s Joint Research Unit of Urban Geography, Juan Murillo Arias of Madrid-based BBVA Data & Analytics, and José J. Ramasco of the Institute of Interdisciplinary Physics and Complex Systems in Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Their research began as an attempt to use a model in transportation planning that finds the most efficient way people can get to work and extend it into the area of reducing inequality, Louail said.

It also has potential applications in combating the “neighborhood effect,” a self-reinforcing trend that describes how the relative wealth of a person’s neighborhood affects their own wealth, which in turn accelerates the neighborhood’s own tendencies toward wealth or poverty. Rewiring shopping trips to cross those neighborhood boundaries can decrease the gentrification — that urban neighborhoods experience.

But so far, it’s just an algorithm.

“One of the first questions you can ask is — what extent is this scenario implementable?” Louail said. “What it’s going to take to perform in real life, and how you will motivate people to change their travel destination for shopping.”

The rise of so-called “big data” raises interesting questions about how social scientists and anti-poverty activists approach their work, said Sarah Elwood, a professor in the University of Washington’s Department of Geography who studies the intersection of geographic information systems and technology with social justice and inequality. “We’re seeing more of these sorts of practices that sort of try to get at the behaviors of individual people and try to get them to do something different.”

Guiding and changing individual behavior to instigate social change is possible, both at the grassroots level and as “nudge policies” enacted by governments, she said.

Yet such small actions don’t address the structural causes of poverty. “It’s important to differentiate between questions of inequality and questions of impoverishment,” Elwood added. “You can change the degree of inequality in a society without having acted to change the big processes of impoverishment.”

Louail and Lenormand agree. If reversing inequality were the goal, then even an algorithm embedded in a smartphone app would require other measures, such as policy decisions or local government incentives to encourage participation. “But [the solution] is not an app, of course, and maybe I think that the city government, local government somehow could imagine some incentives to help, to motivate people to engage in these kinds of collective enterprises,” Louail said.

“We remind the readers [of our study] that the possible tools of city governance to mitigate inequalities are necessary but they’re not sufficient to resolve everything,” he continued. “And so what we proposed is you can articulate or supplement governance with more bottom-up initiatives.”

The researchers see this as an important first step toward using large amounts of data to address social problems.

Since their paper was published, they’ve been contacted by people from around the world interested in developing mobile apps or other technology based on their “Robin Hood” algorithm.

Louail and Lenormand are still considering what next steps they might take. Elwood thinks this is an opportunity to bring other dimensions into the research. “I think big data is going to continue getting bigger,” she notes, “but I believe there are significant aspects of human knowledge, human experience, expressions in social life in cities that we are never going to be able to capture in data.”

“I would want to put their data science expertise together with people who know and study the politics of urban redevelopment, people who think about housing policy, people who think about existing approaches to development in metro areas,” she says. “For me, this is the moment for complex research teams that can ask questions from a variety of different standpoints and be more than the sum of their parts.”

This story originally appeared in Yes! Magazine and is reprinted here with permission.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/shop-here-not-there-science-says-reducing-economic-inequality-could-be-that-simple

New innovation aims to assist safeguard farmers in Robertson County – WSMV News 4

(WSMV)

SPRINGFIELD, TN (WSMV) –

In Robertson County, it’s CSI meets farming.

The Robertson County Sheriff’s Office is using new technology to help protect farmers from criminals with a solution called SmartWater CSI.

The sheriff’s office is the first agency in Tennessee to incorporate SmartWater CSI as a crime prevention tool. The new program is called FarmWatch.

Every bottle has a unique chemical forensic code, kind of like DNA. That bottle is registered to a farmer or property owner, which they can use on their equipment.

Anything marked with SmartWater CSI can be traced back to its original location, and anyone who touches the marked equipment can be placed at the scene of a crime.

“Sounds like a pretty good idea to me,” said farmer Kenneth Foster.

Foster knows agricultural crimes exist.

“Most of the time it’s more vandalism than anything else,” he said. “(Thieves) came in one night after we’d shut down, and cut our hoses and got what anhydrous (ammonia) they wanted.”

Anhydrous ammonia is sometimes used to make methamphetamine.

According to a news release, the Robertson County Sheriff’s Office has been working with farmers for years developing a plan for this program.

The sheriff’s office states all inmates booked into the jail will be scanned for contact with SmartWater CSI.

The solution is pretty much invisible to the naked eye. But, under an ultraviolet light, it shows up as a bright yellow color.

The sheriff’s office will be distributing a limited number of kits on the initial launch of the program.

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New Technology Will Produce Brain Circuitry Diagrams

Summary: Researchers have actually established a brand-new technique that maps the neural connections of entire insect brains.Source: CalTech.The human brain is made up of billions of neurons wired together in elaborate webs and interacting through electrical pulses and chemical signals. Although neuroscientists have actually made development in understanding the brain’s numerous functions– such as managing sleep, saving memories, and deciding– picturing the entire “wiring diagram “of neural connections throughout a brain is not possible using presently available approaches. Now, using Drosophila fruit flies, Caltech scientists have actually developed a technique to easily see neural connections and the flow of interactions in genuine time within living flies. The work is an advance towards creating a map of the entire fly brain’s numerous connections, which could help scientists understand the neural circuits within human brains as well.A paper describing the work appears online in the December 12 problem of eLife. The research was carried out in the lab of Caltech research teacher Carlos Lois.”If an electrical engineer wants to understand how a computer system works, the very first thing that she or he would want to determine is how the various elements are wired to each other, “says Lois.”Likewise, we need to understand how neurons are wired together in order to comprehend how brains work.”When two neurons connect, they link together with a structure called a synapse, an area through which one neuron can send out and receive electrical and chemical signals to or from another nerve cell. Even if multiple nerve cells are extremely close together, they need synapses to really communicate.The Lois lab has actually established a technique for tracing the circulation of details throughout synapses, called SYSTEM(Transneuronal Control of Transcription ). Using genetically crafted Drosophila fruit

flies, TRACT enables researchers to observe which neurons are” talking” and which nerve cells are”listening”by triggering the linked nerve cells to produce glowing proteins.With TRACT, when a neuron”talks”– or sends a chemical or electrical signal across a synapse– it will likewise produce and send out along a fluorescent protein that lights up both the talking neuron and its synapses with a specific color

. Any nerve cells “listening”to the signal receive this protein, which binds to a so-called receptor molecule– genetically integrated by the researchers– on the receiving neuron’s surface area. The binding of the signal protein activates the receptor and triggers the nerve cell it’s connected to in order to produce its own, differently colored fluorescent protein. In this way, communication between nerve cells ends up being visible. Utilizing a type of microscope that can peer through a thin window set up on the fly’s head, the scientists can observe the vibrant radiance of neural connections in genuine time as the fly grows, moves, and experiences modifications in its environment.Many neurological and psychiatric conditions, such as autism and schizophrenia, are believed to be triggered by transformed connections in between neurons. Using SYSTEM, scientists can keep track of the neuronal connections in the brains of numerous flies every day, allowing them to make contrasts at various stages of advancement, between the sexes, and in flies that have genetic anomalies. Thus, SYSTEM might be utilized to identify how various diseases alarm the connections within brain circuits. Furthermore, because neural synapses alter with time, SYSTEM enables the monitoring of synapse formation and damage from day to day. Having the ability to see how and when nerve cells form or break synapses will be important to comprehending how the circuits in the brain put together as the animal grows, and how they fall apart with age or disease.TRACT can be localized to focus in on the electrical wiring of any specific neural circuit of interest, such as those that control movement, appetite, or vision. Lois and his group evaluated their method by taking a look at neurons within the well-understood olfactory circuit, the nerve cells responsible for

the sense of odor. Their results verified existing information concerning this specific circuit’s wiring diagram. In addition, they analyzed the circadian circuit, which is accountable for the waking and sleeping cycle, where they detected brand-new possible synaptic connections.TRACT, nevertheless, can do more than produce electrical wiring diagrams. The transgenic flies can be genetically engineered so that the method triggers getting neurons to produce proteins that have a function, instead of colorful proteins that merely trace connections.”We could use practical proteins to ask,’What occurs in the fly

if I silence all the nerve cells that receive input from this one neuron?'” states Lois.” Or, alternatively,’Exactly what happens if I make the neurons that are connected to this nerve cell hyperactive?’Our method not just enables us to create an electrical wiring diagram of the brain, but

likewise to genetically modify the function of neurons in a brain circuit.”The TRACT approach permits the identification of nerve cells linked by synapses in a brain circuit. This image shows the olfactory receptor nerve cells (red )activating the production of a green protein in their synaptically-connected downstream partners. NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Lois Laboratory.Previous methods for analyzing neural connections were time consuming

and labor extensive, involving thousands of thin slices of a brain rebuilded into a three-dimensional structure. A laboratory utilizing these techniques could just yield a diagram for a single, little piece of fruit-fly brain each year. Furthermore, these techniques could not be carried out

on living animals, making it difficult to see how nerve cells communicated in real time.Because the TRACT approach is completely genetically encoded, it is perfect for usage in lab animals such as Drosophila and zebrafish; ultimately, Lois wishes to carry out the technique in mice to make it possible for the neural tracing of a mammalian brain. “TRACT is a new tool that will permit us to produce wiring diagrams of brains and determine the function of connected nerve cells,”he says.”This information will provide important ideas towards understanding the complex functions of the human brain and its illness.”About this neuroscience research study post Funding: Funding was offered by BRAIN award UO1 MH109147 from the National Institutes of Health.Source: Lori Dajose– CalTech Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Lois Laboratory.Original Research: Abstract for “Tracing neuronal circuits in transgenic

animals by transneuronal control of transcription(TRACT)” by Ting-hao Huang, Peter Niesman, Deepshika Arasu, Daniel

Lee, Aubrie De La Cruz, Antuca Callejas , Elizabeth J
Hong, and Carlos Lois Is a corresponding author in eLife. Published online December 12 2017 doi:10.7554/ eLife.32027 Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Short Article CalTech “New Innovation Will Produce Brain Wiring Diagrams.
“NeuroscienceNews.
NeuroscienceNews, 14 January 2018.

Meet the 47 incredible YouTubers joining forces to change the world.

When YouTuber Riyadh K shared his coming out story with the world, it came as a shock to viewers.

But it wasn’t shocking because Riyadh is gay — it was that his father had a confession of his own: The night he found out about his son’s sexuality, he had thought about taking his own life.

“It was stupid,” his father says through tears.

Camera rolling, Riyadh embraces him, and goes on to tell his audience of over 300,000 subscribers about the incredible journey his family had been on since that night years ago.  

Because despite the initial shock and despite their conservative backgrounds, his parents have gone on to lead pride parades, meet their son’s boyfriends, and celebrate his community. They love their son unconditionally.

“I’ve never seen a turnaround in two parents as I’ve seen in these two,” Riyadh tells his audience. “If we can go from where we were, to where we are now … you can too.”

While most people wouldn’t dream of posting a video like this, it was natural for Riyadh, who knew just how impactful these videos could be.

After all, he had relied on the community of LGBTQ+ YouTubers to find self-acceptance for himself. “YouTube was a safe haven for me at a time when I felt alone, lost and unsure of who I was,” he said in a press statement.

And today, his video has been viewed over 5 million times. Not only that, but there are over 13,000 comments on Riyadh’s video, many from parents and queer youth alike, deeply grateful for his family’s honesty.

All photos via YouTube.

For content creators like Riyadh, YouTube is more than just a platform — it’s an important opportunity to make an impact.

“It was on YouTube that I became an ‘accidental activist,’” he said. “I found my people and I found a purpose on this incredible platform.”

He continued, “Using YouTube to engage a global audience on issues that matter to me and my community has become my primary focus and passion in life.”

That’s why this year, Riyadh has joined forces with 47 other creators around the world as part of YouTube’s Creators for Change program.

It’s a global initiative for YouTubers looking to promote awareness and empathy for diverse communities as well as the social issues that impact them most.

Creators from countries as far away as Indonesia, Israel, and Turkey have joined him in the Creators for Change program. Among them are Omar Farooq from Bahrain, whose weekly series “Omar Tries” features Omar exploring different professions and experiences to better understand people and cultures around the world.

“Seeing life through the eyes of others is the way to tolerance and acceptance,” said Farooq. “This [can] defeat any form of hate.”

There’s also Victoria Volkova, a creator in Mexico City who documented her gender transition in an effort to promote acceptance and awareness for the transgender community, particularly women.

“The Creators for Change program means an opportunity for all those communities that feel like an outcast or that they don’t belong to have a voice,” she said. “I can try to give power to these communities and [let] them know that they matter.”

Another creator is Jouelzy, who created the #SmartBrownGirl movement to empower women of color and create a safe space for them to push back against the norms that harm them. “Cultural education is needed,” she said, “both in that you learn about others, but also that you learn about your own ancestors and the stories that connect us all.”

With the help of YouTube’s Creators for Change program — which includes boot camps, video production help, and mentorship — creators like Riyadh, Farooq, Jouelzy, and Volkova will be empowered to do even more for their communities.

With a combined 26 million subscribers between them, this year’s Creators for Change could have a huge, global impact.

That’s also why they hope to inspire others to raise their voices and make a difference too.

“The more we talk with and understand one another, the better we can come to an understanding of how to make this world better for the next generation,” YouTuber and Creator for Change ambassador Jazza John said. That’s why he uses his platform to educate audiences about gay rights, technology, racism, and more.

While starting a conversation might seem simple, creators like Riyadh know that it’s at the core of changing hearts and minds.

“The moment we start sharing stories is when we begin to empathize with one another, and destroy the barrier between ‘us’ and ‘them’ that we never knew was there,” he said.

“The more we normalize the ‘other’” he added, “the faster we can learn to accept and love what we are not.”

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/meet-the-47-incredible-you-tubers-joining-forces-to-change-the-world

Eaton’s engine cylinder deactivation brand-new innovation

Eaton Cylinder Deactivation– CDA system is the most direct way to minimize CO2 emission, and at the very same time improve fuel economy through driving cycle. It gets rid of the obstacles of designing a high performance engine that is enhanced for fuel effectiveness. CDA shuts down the cylinders of the engine whenever full power is not needed. Because method, remaining, active cylinders run in higher performance mode, increasing fuel efficiency.Eaton is knowledgeable

in engine air management. They offer a variety of cylinder deactivation options for Type 2( roller finger follower )valvetrains including: Hydraulic Lash Adjuster-based Roller Rocker Arm-based Roller Lifter-based Camshaft-based Eaton has actually focused its Cylinder Deactivation System offer mainly to the gas engines

with Type II valvetrain. While normally applied to Type II engines generally, they can also be developed for Type I( direct acting )and Type III(center pivot )valvetrains, frequently used for Medium and Sturdy Diesel engines. For Gas Type II engines with odd variety of cylinders (3-cylinders)Eaton Dynamic Cylinder Deactivation systems enables large field of usage of CDA function: as much as 50%of engine load and up to 4000 rpm.Eaton Cylinder Deactivation function might be integrated (based on )various valvetrain elements: Hydraulic Lash Adjuster-based: Latch Pin under HLA keeps

part as solid if cylinder is triggered. To shut off a cylinder, the pin is withdrawn and when the cam presses on the RRA, the HLA collapses into its real estate, instead of moving the valve.Roller Rocker Arm-based: Latch Pin holds the RR/A as one strong piece. To shut off a cylinder, the pin is withdrawn and the RR/A becomes two concentrically rotated pieces. When the web cam presses on the roller

, the roller arm rotates around the valve. Rocker arm and valve do not move.Roller Lifter-based: Established for, larger displacement, fuel engines with pushrod type valvetrain.Camshaft based: Axial Cam-Shifting based, dynamic or traditional CDA.Source: Eaton

Source

http://www.car-engineer.com/eatons-cylinder-deactivation-technology/

Little Ripper Drones: How new technology is keeping us safer at the beach

Little Ripper Drones: How new technology is keeping us safer at the beach

Meet the latest tool in a Queensland Surf Life Saver’s kit.

The Little Ripper Drone can fly about 800 metres offshore and can help rescuers spot hazards like rips and sharks, and even deploy a small raft to swimmers in danger.

It has been deployed by senior rescuers on the Sunshine Coast to spot struggling swimmers, and swimmers venturing outside the flags.

One of the first lifesavers trained to pilot the drone, Trent Robinson, said it was all about increasing the surveillance capacity to spot people before they get into trouble in the water.

“With lifeguarding we’re really all about preventative measures,” he said.

“The more surveillance we have the more chance we have of getting to people before they need to be rescued.

“Rescues are not what we want to be doing.”

But there have been plenty of rescues on the Sunshine Coast recently, including one incident where nine teenagers had to be pulled from a rip and another where a helicopter was required to drag an 18-year-old girl to safety.

Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) said that in the first few weeks of summer there were 88 rescues from Sunshine Coast beaches and 78 of those rescued were outside the flags.

Men more likely to ignore safety warnings

The general manager of the Alexandra Headland Surf Life Saving Club, Ashley Robinson, said the drones would be useful along stretches of Mooloolaba and Alexandra Headland beaches where beachgoers often ignored safety warnings and walked directly from their car to the surf.

“Australians don’t like to be told what to do, they’re a very relaxed race. People think they can swim wherever they like,” Mr Robinson said.

He said the worst offenders were older men.

“Particularly men who are the head of a household who think, ‘I’m not going to have an 18 or 19-year-old girl tell me I can’t swim here’,” Mr Robinson said.

“They get embarrassed in front of their kids, well it’s not as embarrassing as getting rescued or losing a child.”

Could drones land at your beach?

Surf Life Savers will use the drones around Mooloolaba and Noosa with more rescuers practising their drone techniques on Stradbroke Island.

The drones could be deployed elsewhere but require a complex arrangement of council and civil aviation permits, including no take off or landing within 30 metres of people.

But despite the challenges, senior lifeguard Trent Robinson said it was an exciting time.

“We went from the reel to rescue tubes, to boards.

“Then we went to inflatable boats and jet skis so this is just another level in that rescue capability.

“So drones are the future and we’ll be using them.”

Although he insisted the technology will never replace human lifesavers.

“This is just another stage,” he said.

“I think the old boys would be surprised, but they were shocked when we started using jet skis.”

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First posted

Source

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-12-20/beach-drones-sunshine-coast-surf-life-saving-queensland/9275646

Trump Administration Axes Funding For NASA System That Monitors Greenhouse Gases

The Trump administration has quietly eliminated funding for NASA’s research program that tracks greenhouse gases around the world.

According to Science, the Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) tracks the world’s flow of carbon dioxide from space. Such a system is critical to monitoring any improvements — or failures — in attempts to cut the pollution linked to climate change.

NASA spokesman Steve Cole told the magazine that the program was canceled due to ”budget constraints and higher priorities within the science budget.” Usually, Congress battles such cuts, but this time, there was simply no mention of the program’s $10 million annual budget in the White House budget.

Although existing grants will finish, Cole said, no new projects will be undertaken. NASA’s budget report for fiscal year 2019 assumes the “termination” of CMS.

Getty/Alexandros Maragos

Many of the projects CMS has tracked involved how effectively forests, including tropical forests, trap carbon dioxide. Carbon measurements were also critical for compliance with air pollution reduction goals, such as those required by the Paris climate agreement. In June 2017, Trump announced that the U.S. would withdraw from the accord.

“If you cannot measure emissions reductions, you cannot be confident that countries are adhering to the agreement,” Tufts University environment professor Kelly Sims Gallagher told Science. She also called canceling the NASA program a “grave mistake.”

Climate change expert Rachel Licker of the Union of Concerned Scientists also told the BBC  that “dismantling CMS will adversely affect our ability to track flows of carbon through our land, oceans and atmosphere.”

Europe has one carbon-monitoring satellite of its own and is on track to develop more. As the U.S. under Trump turns increasingly to fossil fuels, including coal, experts warn that it will cede developing cutting-edge technology focusing on pollution reduction and alternative fuels to other nations. 

“We really shoot ourselves in the foot if we let other people develop the technology” and lose that edge in the economies of the future, Phil Duffy, president of the Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts, told Science.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/nasa-greenhouse-gas-monitoring-killed_us_5af50a35e4b0e57cd9f7db6b

Algonquin library 5K to raise money for new technology, programs

In the midst of a multimillion-dollar renovation project, the Algonquin Area Public Library District is hosting its first 5K walk and run this month to raise money for new technologies and services.

As the main library at 2600 Harnish Drive is expanded over the next year, library officials hope to stay ahead of the curve by filling the additional space with cutting-edge technology and more innovative programs, Director Stephen Bero said. Doing so would also require hiring more people, he said.

A funding plan is already in place for the $6.7 million redevelopment project, Bero said, and the library has the financial stability to pay for additional resources.

“But are we really achieving our fullest potential?” he asked. “We do have the opportunity with this fundraiser to use the money to experiment and see what the future might hold for our community. … Let’s see what more we can do and make sure we have the funding for that.”

The Library Loop 5K is at 8 a.m. Oct. 22 throughout the neighborhoods and walking paths surrounding the main library.

Hoping to draw large crowds of spectators and participants, event organizer Theresa Therens said the race will include an appearance by Algonquin native Evan Jager, the 2016 Olympic silver medalist in the 3,000-meter steeplechase. Students from Community Unit District 300 are also expected to perform.

More than 60 runners and walkers have registered so far, out of her goal of 100 participants, Therens said. She hopes to raise roughly $10,000.

During a strategic planning session last year, library trustees indicated their desire for alternate revenue sources and directed the staff to pursue fundraising options, Bero said. A race committee led by Therens, the library’s administrative assistant, was created earlier this year.

“It’s a learning experience for all of us, but I think we’ve had sufficient time to work and plan,” Bero said. “Those plans are starting to bear fruit, and we can feel the enthusiasm start to build for that.”

Runners and walkers of all ages can register until 15 minutes before the race begins. Registration, which can be completed on the library’s website, costs $10 for youth participants, $15 for teens, $35 for people 20 to 59, and $32.50 for people 60 and older.

Source

http://dailyherald.com/news/20171003/algonquin-library-5k-to-raise-money-for-new-technology-programs

Sales ops offer tips for onboarding brand-new innovation suppliers

In previous posts, I’ve discussed how to evaluate the costs of a new sales tool, and offered some general best practices for managing your tech stack. To help you roll out the new technology your sales leadership just purchased, I’ve outlined some general guidelines you can follow to help the organization onboard a vendor successfully.  

Include End Users in the Implementation

While sales ops may be more technologically adept at managing new tools, chances are we’re not going to use the tools nearly as much as our team. When implementing new technology always try to include a few of your end users in the design and implementation. I always tend to go for the sales reps that I know have no problem being honest (the harsher the better!). It’s where you’re going to get your best feedback, and it also makes the rollout and adoption more likely to succeed. It’s one thing for Joe, the Sales Systems guy, to tell the sales team how great a tool is (to eye rolls and head nods) and it’s another thing entirely to use testimonials from fellow sales reps they know and love. If possible, you should to have an exec sponsor, or champion for every implementation that can tell the team why they should use this new tool.

Train Each Role Separately

This one does depend on the complexity of the tool. Something like ZoomInfo for instance is relatively straightforward, click a button and get some contact info, while something like Outreach.io is much more complex and requires more training. I’m sure most organizations conduct a training for their reps when a new tool is purchased, however one thing I’ve noticed is that it’s typically one training for the whole sales org. This includes Account Managers, BDRs, Sales Managers – everyone! The problem here is that sometimes these tools are going to be used completely differently depending on the role, so one training ends up being too high level, without enough time spent in the weeds. When I say role, I don’t mean title either, sort your users into buckets depending on how they will actually use the system regardless of their title. At the very least if there are set expectations for the system use, you want to ensure Sales Managers are trained on their team’s expectations so they can enforce them for you.

You’re never going to get an implementation perfect the first time around, additionally your users are going to have much better ideas than you are for improvements. Ensure there’s an open and accessible way for your users to provide feedback and make sure they’re comfortable doing so. All the best ideas come from my reps, and chances are if they have some feedback there’s going to be some value in exploring it.

All technology and process is iterative, keep gathering feedback, and keep improving on that feedback.

After you implement your new tools, here are five tips to help your sales reps be as productive as possible.  

Source

http://www.insightsquared.com/2018/01/sales-ops-offer-tips-for-onboarding-new-technology-vendors/