Tag Archives: media-industry

Time Person of the Year poll awards #MeToo movement

The #MeToo campaign is Time’s ‘Person of the Year’ for 2017, beating U.S. President Donald Trump. 

The magazine cover, with the headline “The Silence Breakers”, pays tribute to the “voices that launched a movement”. 

It features actress Ashley Judd, popstar Taylor Swift, Uber whistleblower Susan Fowler, lobbyist Adama Iwu and other women who campaigned against sexual harassment, sexual assault and rape this year or took part to the #MeToo campaign. 

“This is the fastest moving social change we’ve seen in decades, and it began with individual acts of courage by hundreds of women — and some men, too — who came forward to tell their own stories,” the mag’s editor-in-chief Edward Felsenthal told NBC’s “Today” program. 

At the bottom right of the front page, you can see the arm of a sixth woman who’s shared her story of sexual assault while remaining anonymous.

“The women and men who have broken their silence span all races, all income classes, all occupations and virtually all corners of the globe,” reads the Time article on the movement. “They might labor in California fields, or behind the front desk at New York City’s regal Plaza Hotel, or in the European Parliament. They’re part of a movement that has no formal name. But now they have a voice.”

Alyssa Milano, who relaunched the #MeToo movement — first started a decade ago by social activist Tarana Burke, who used it to support women of color surviving sexual abuse — in the wake of sexual harassment allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, reacted on Twitter to the Time cover: 

Among the women who appear in the Time article is Susan Fowler, the ex-Uber engineer who in February penned a powerful blogpost about sexism at Uber that eventually led to ouster of founder Travis Kalanick as CEO. 

Her essay also pushed other women in the tech industry to come forward and speak out about sexual harassment in Silicon Valley. 

In August, Fowler’s legal team filed an amicus brief in a labor law case going before the Supreme Court. 

While it doesn’t involve Uber directly, the case revolves around the sort of class-action waivers the ride-hailing company forces its employees to sign. 

The move is designed to force employees to give up their right to take collective action against their employer, coercing them into individual arbitration. 

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/12/06/time-person-of-the-year-metoo-women-sexual-harassment/

Netflix subscribers, get ready for a rise in prices

Get ready to pay just a bit more for your Netflix subscription.

The streaming video service will be raising prices on its middle and top tier plans in the U.S. starting in November. Subscribers who currently pay for the standard $9.99 service will be charged $10.99. The price of the premium tier will rise from $11.99 to $13.99. 

Good news for people on the basic $7.99 plan—that price is staying put, for now. 

The U.S.-only price hikes will begin to go into effect in November, varying depending on individuals’ billing cycles. Starting on Oct. 19, subscribers will be notified and given at least 30 days notice about the increase.  

Netflix declined to make any executives available for interview but did release a statement regarding the price increases: “From time to time, Netflix plans and pricing are adjusted as we add more exclusive TV shows and movies, introduce new product features and improve the overall Netflix experience to help members find something great to watch even faster.”

The screenshot below highlights the different Netflix plans available and their features, along with their old prices.

Image: netflix screenshot

Netflix hasn’t announced a major change in pricing since 2014. That increase featured a lengthy grandfathering system that meant many existing customers paid $7.99 until 2016. Netflix tried to institute a system that rolled out its price hikes slowly, giving longtime subscribers plenty of lead time. The intentions may have been good, but the process was confusing.

The price change this time around is simple and immediate, particularly compared to its last increase. By December, every Netflix subscriber will be paying the higher price. 

Those extra dollars will add up for Netflix, which has grown rapidly in recent years both in subscribers and spending. The company now produces a large amount of original content, and there’s plenty more on the way. Plans to spend $6 billion on projects in 2018 were recently revised by content head Ted Sarandos, who added a cool billion dollars on top.

That money is going to major investments in original series, comedy specials, documentaries, and films—an area that Netflix seems to be putting renewed focus on.

Netflix has also been bolstering its service with new features, rolling out downloads and interactive content.

Asking for more money from subscribers will inevitably be met with a certain amount of blowback, particularly as consumers are now faced with a growing number of options for internet-delivered TV. Netflix faces growing competition from similar services including Amazon’s Prime Video and HBO Now, as well as a variety of streaming TV bundles and smaller video-on-demand services. 

Rising prices combined with the sheer number of options available have led to questions about the value of internet-delivered TV when compared to traditional cable subscriptions.

Netflix, however, appears well positioned to bump its prices up a bit. Its standard plan is still cheaper than HBO ($15 per month) and Hulu’s commercial-free plan ($11.99). 

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/05/netflix-raising-prices-again/